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The Wire, I'll say it again=best show on TV

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i've never watched this show. practically the only tv I ever watch is HBO on demand though. sopranos, curb your enthusiasm, some six feet under and entourage.

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i rented the whole first season, and judging from the first three episodes i definitely like what I see so far. the only thing is that the show is pretty hard to pick up on even from the first episode because of it's huge wealth of characters. also, its hard to distinguish between the good and the bad guys although this is one of the shows highest points as well. im looking forward to seeing the rest of the season.

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yes, because we all know all cop shows are alike.

 

Never said all cop shows were alike, just that the 'rough, streetwise narc unit' is an overused formula and compared with other HBO shows like OZ, Carnivale, Deadwood, Rome, and even the first couple of years of the Sopranos, The Wire is average.

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Never said all cop shows were alike, just that the 'rough, streetwise narc unit' is an overused formula and compared with other HBO shows like OZ, Carnivale, Deadwood, Rome, and even the first couple of years of the Sopranos, The Wire is average.

who cares, that's like ragging on the beatles because they just make pop music. they did it better than anyone else, just as the wire has. best casting decisions ever, and some of the most rewarding in depth stories you'll ever watch. have you watched all of season 2?

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who cares, that's like ragging on the beatles because they just make pop music. they did it better than anyone else, just as the wire has. best casting decisions ever, and some of the most rewarding in depth stories you'll ever watch. have you watched all of season 2?

 

Yes and it's good just not superb.

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By Karla Peterson

UNION-TRIBUNE TELEVISION CRITIC

 

In a cruel stroke of poetic injustice, the latest edition of HBO's “The Wire” is so smart and so beautifully written, there is no way to describe it without sounding like a blathering idiot. Words fail. They really do.

 

Now in its fourth season exploring the unforgiving streets and unraveling bureaucracies of poverty-blasted Baltimore, “The Wire” is more than just the best show on television. This sprawling, ferocious drama is one of the richest, most compelling pieces of entertainment created by anyone at any time in pop-culture history. And even that over-the-top endorsement feels like it comes up short somehow.

 

The TV gold doesn't come without a price. With its huge cast and knotty plots that rival Charles Dickens in their scope and attention to detail, “The Wire” has never been a comfy viewing experience. And Sunday's Season 4 premiere is no exception.

 

Like its teeming cast of caustic cops and too-cool criminals, “The Wire” isn't about to sit around and wait for you to get with the program. The show has been off the air for almost two years, but the latest installment plunges viewers back into the fray without any getting-to-know-you niceties. You might have to work to catch up, but it will be worth it.

 

At the end of Season 3, the show's messy universe was spinning into chaos. Gentleman drug lord Stringer Bell was dead. Avon Barksdale – Stringer's partner, best friend and betrayer – was back in jail. And Marlo, the quietly deadly drug kingpin, was slipping into the vacuum left by Avon's crumbling empire.

 

Meanwhile, maverick police officer Bunny Colvin was disgraced and demoted, his career torpedoed by his noble experiment in drug legalization. And anti-hero detective Jimmy McNulty? After his years of tracking Stringer and Avon ended in death and a thwarted wire-tapping investigation, the dogged McNulty went back to being a beat cop.

 

That was then, but the now is equally complicated.

 

In Sunday's whirlwind hour (which was written by creator and executive producer David Simon), we discover that those Barksdale wiretaps may do some major damage after all, although Jimmy probably won't be around to watch the dominoes fall. (Unfortunately for fans of actor Dominic West, it looks as if Jimmy won't be around for much of anything this season.)

 

We also see that post-Stringer life has not been good for baby-faced dealer Bodie and Avon's corner boys and that running for mayor is bad for Councilman Tommy Carcetti's mental health. And while we thought we knew the depths of Marlo's murderous genius, a plot involving androgynous hench-woman Snoop and a top-of-the-line nail gun show how low he can go.

 

As always, “The Wire” slips between the worlds of crime, punishment and politics as deftly as a master spy. But this season, the show's territory expands to include Baltimore's public schools as experienced by four middle-school boys who are already heading down a bad path.

 

Having turned their laser-beam eyes on the emotional and societal costs of the drug wars, creator Simon and his team spend this season looking at a system that is too broke and beaten down to provide the support that could keep these rootless kids from becoming Marlo's latest flunkies. When the local drug dealer is giving neighborhood boys the school-supply money their parents can't provide (assuming the parents are even around), you know something has gone terribly wrong.

 

Inspired by writer and producer Edward Burns' seven years of teaching social studies in Baltimore – not to mention his 20 years as a city police detective – this new story arc makes for some heartbreaking developments. It also gives this crusading show the chance to do the kind of consciousness-raising that TV can't usually be bothered with.

 

Because the social commentary is so deeply rooted in the show's complex characters, there isn't a soapbox in sight. And even if there were, you would be too blinded by explosions of ethnically diverse acting talent to notice.

 

From the masterful vets – Wendell Pierce as the deliciously profane Detective William “Bunk” Moreland; Aidan Gillen as the imploding Carcetti; Felicia Pearson as the terrifying Snoop – to the four young actors who bring the schoolboys to rambunctious life, every performer is an irreplaceable piece of “The Wire”'s human puzzle. Forget Team “Lost” and the “Sopranos” gang. This is the best acting ensemble on television.

 

“Bust every head, who you gonna talk to when (stuff) happens?” the streetwise Sgt. Carver (Seth Gilliam) asks a hot-headed co-worker.

 

With its cool head, sharp funny bone and furious heart, “The Wire” has plenty to say about its crazy corner of the world. And when (stuff) happens, you will be very glad you took the time to listen.

 

 

 

can't wait for the season opener

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finished watching season four last night and i can't stop thinking about it. i've never watched a show that's moved me the way that season did. seeing how the inner city public school system sets so many people up for failure and a life of crime depressed the shit out of me. the wire's main focus is about exposing how american institutions leave people completely trapped, but there's something so totally unnerving when the ones who are trapped are just kids. innocent kids who are forced into a life of crime because that's the only opportunity to make it out of poverty, even if it's only a temporary fix until they get arrested or killed. it opens your eyes to who are the criminals in our society and why they choose that way of life. we like to delude ourselves into believing that criminals are born evil without a soul and are lower than the rest of us because of what they do, but that couldn't be further from the truth.

 

this is probably the most important, affecting, and informative show i've ever watched. it's not popular, i believe, because people like to escape reality when they turn to forms of entertainment, which i suppose is understandable. but if you want to educate yourself on why there is such disparaging poverty in this country, despite the fact that we're the richest nation in the world, you owe it to yourself to watch the wire. buy the dvds, download it off the internet, see it in syndication, but for christs sake people, watch this show.

 

thats all i got to say

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of course it's 'fiction' in the sense that none of these characters and stories actually happened, but if you're inferring that these things don't happen every day to people caught in the ghetto's of america, you're deluding yourself. it's basically journalism told through dramatic story telling. the creators are an ex baltimore sun writer who covered homicide for years and an ex-cop, who also happened to teach in the inner-city for 7 years. it's authentic down to every last detail, as every article i've ever read about it quotes cops, politicians, and city officials saying as such. my roomate lives in the innercity of detroit and said that pretty much everything shown on the show he's seen in his own neighborhood

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season one addresses the futile 'War on Drugs' in America, and introduces us to the people on either side of the divide struggling to cling to the greased ladders of their respective organisations. the bulk of the season focuses on the investigation and wire tapping of a major drugs organisation. season two addresses the disenfranchisement of Baltimore's ports, and the death of its traditional working class, through an investigation of drug smuggling and white slavery. season three returns to the drug war, considers the possibility for reform in the city's various institutions, and demonstrates how our entrenched, uncritical attitudes on America's 'Wars' -- both at home and abroad -- are perpetually leading us down a useless downward spiral of death and despair. season four turns to Baltimore's failing education system, and its mayoral politics, to argue that the problems the other seasons have addressed are deep-seeded and perhaps even inescapable given the inability of the city's systems to effectively speak to and save its children. much of season four focuses on the times and tribulations of four middle-school kids from Baltimore's poor Westside.

 

 

taken from another board

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