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Pickled Dog

Jungle

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glad to hear it! i'll keep posting stuff every now and then until someone else joins me. 

 

there was this compilation out a few years back of Suburban Base Records stuff that really got me hooked - http://www.theguardian.com/music/video/2014/mar/07/suburban-base-records-jungle-drum-bass-video-review. 3 CDs. i was listening to the third one in the car today for the first time in a while and it's probably one of the best mixes of anything i've ever heard. i recently downloaded Moving Shadow's entire output and i've slowly been working my way through it. hit and miss but when it's good it's really really fucking good.

 

never viewed drum & bass that favourably when I was growing up though it was a pretty inescapable sound. sad that i missed out on jungle more specifically at the time because i mean cmon what's not to like? it's so smart. puts so much more modern high energy dance music to shame.

 

 

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i support your initiative and these tracks are phenomenal. Nylon Roadster is my favorite so far, beautiful dynamics. i'll try to find that comp.

 

this reminds me that one of my best friends actually knows how to dance to this stuff and he made it look super easy (...facebook-sad-smiley.png it was anything but).

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hahaha. i remember watching a documentary that talked about the reason jungle had the gradual name / style change to drum & bass and it was because of the two camps that dancers fell into.

 

either you were insane and tried to bounce to the drums or you let the drums wash over you and follow the bass. sprint vs marathon. (personally, it's all about riding that bass for me.) focussing on those elements, you get the split and eventually you dubstep and then EDM boils it all down to just the drop. i feel like all that did was slowly erase jungle's magic though.

 

 

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thx mane

 

i like your summary of this scene's history and cultural background

 

this morning i was listening to Love Spirals Downwards' swan song and felt tempted to post some of those tunes here (they came up with a strange dream pop + atmospheric d'n'b fusion in that record) but it would have been a poor/baffling contribution to your thread ) ;

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thx mane

 

i like your summary of this scene's history and cultural background

 

this morning i was listening to Love Spirals Downwards' swan song and felt tempted to post some of those tunes (they came up with a strange dream pop + atmospheric d'n'b fusion in that record) but it would have been a poor/baffling contribution to your thread ) ;

 

i edited it out because, to be honest, i dont fucking know what i'm talking about and that's not jungle's appeal for me and i've never been involved in a scene like that so i feel like an imposter writing out my understanding of it here but it's basically true and i think it says a lot for how it still sounds like nothing else. 

 

i never even liked jungle or drum and bass growing up and it's only strangely through noticing its disappearance that i've sought it out. where i'm from in Hull they have this annual travelling fair in October every year which was (and i think still is) the biggest travelling fair in europe. so many rollercoasters and fortune tellers and unwinnable hoop-throwing games and shoot out booths and all that kind of stuff. hundreds of them. and i remember going as a kid and it was all lasers and the sounds of jungle, gabba, drum and bass, and it was relentless and this totally otherworldly experience. like a kid's answer to ibiza or something. i used to go with all my friends, and i'm talking in the 90s when i was like 10 or under, and everyone went and got fucked up and your insides got pummelled on a year's worth of sugar, drums and bass. but that sound in general was just everywhere. you'd hear it coming out of the estates and people's cars and it was the sound of this other world. and then it just died out.

 

there's been a lot of writing about jungle in recent years and i think Mark Fisher has a lot to do with its resurgence. his ideas articulate what i like about the music of Burial (who he's interviewed a few times and, if you like Burial, they're probably the best interviews out there) or Lee Gamble.

 

Lee Gamble in particular is one of my favourite artists out there right now and he's a blatant junglist. he doesn't use amen breaks but it's just the vibe. it's there.

 

extract from Mark Fisher's book Ghosts Of My Life: http://thequietus.com/articles/13004-mark-fisher-ghosts-of-my-life-extract

 

 

Nowhere is this clearer than in popular music culture. It was through the mutations of popular music that many of those of us who grew up in the 1960s, 70s and 80s learned to measure the passage of cultural time. But faced with 21st Century music, it is the very sense of future shock which has disappeared. This is quickly established by performing a simple thought experiment. Imagine any record released in the past couple of years being beamed back in time to, say, 1995 and played on the radio. It’s hard to think that it will produce any jolt in the listeners. On the contrary, what would be likely to shock our 1995 audience would be the very recognisability of the sounds: would music really have changed so little in the next seventeen years? Contrast this with the rapid turnover of styles between the 1960s and the 90s: play a jungle record from 1993 to someone in 1989 and it would have sounded like something so new that it challenged them to rethink what music was, or could be. While 20th Century experimental culture was seized by a recombinatorial delirium, which made it feel as if newness was infinitely available, the 21st Century is oppressed by a crushing sense of finitude and exhaustion. It doesn’t feel like the future. Or, alternatively, it doesn’t feel as if the 21st Century has started yet.

 

i think that applies to a lot of dance music today although there are labels like PAN which are blatantly trying to change that to some extent and the scene around them in Berlin is on to something. artists like Holly Herndon. Autechre have done well to keep pushing their sound and are one of the few acts that, in contrast to popular opinion, i think gets better and more daring with every release.

 

Kodwo Eshun, another influential cultural writers, has a book called More Brilliant Than The Sun, which has huge long passages about jungle's futurism and, more specifically, afrofuturism.

 

Aphex Twin was always the benchmark and i think, technically, he's basically a jungle DJ first, sound artist second. but Syro had lost all its future shock. granted they were old tunes, but when RDJ still feels like the best of the best but isn't "shocking", that says something.

 

jungle's cultural history in the UK as a specifically British but at the same time global deterritorialised sound is unique and it doesn't have a modern equivalent. it's amazing to see what's going on with grime at the moment and that's cool but when i want to be surprised and challenged, digging through jungle records is still my first port of call.

 

anyway, those are my broader thoughts. 

 

i haven't heard the album you mention but this is a jungle thread. there are no baffling contributions! post it up!

 

might be blasphemous to some hardcore junglists but personally i've always felt this kicked arse and the lyrics at the end are really interesting in the context of the drum break. jungle wasn't really explicitly about politics but it was of course unavoidably political.

 

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I've always been under the impression that only british people understand what Jungle is

i don't think I've ever even heard of it but pd's ruminations are intriguing, listened to the first song itt and it's pretty cool

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i think Timeless is the only jungle classic i'm moderately familiar with

 

he actually became an unlikely high profile musician at the time, didn't he?

 

Goldie? Yeah. Huge. Still is pretty huge I think. He was like the figurehead of that world and rightly so. The man's a legend. Still going too. He's been working on live jungle stuff in recent years. Experimenting with how to replicate those insane drums live. Last year he did a big orchestral reimagining of Timeless and other stuff. The after party was Source Direct and Lee Gamble back to back.

 

Goldie took the genre to new heights, ran the Metalheadz label and released a bunch of classics under various aliases such as

 

 

and also the Japan-sampling namesake for that previously mentioned Mark Fisher book:

 

 

i'm digging LSD too. sounds like jungle meets cocteau twins with those vocals = two bristol sounds from the same era smashed together.

 

 

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source direct are my one of my favourites. there aren't too many really good jungle albums but their debut Exorcise Your Demons is massive.

 

 

and Lee Gamble's jungle deconstructions are amazing. made from samples of all the ambient lulls from his old jungle tapes.

 

 

i didn't get to that Goldie night or after party and massively regret it. i was only an hour away at the time.

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btw this is hardly or super vaguely related but this thread is reminding me of Szare a little bit :') or even Shackleton, even though the association is pretty arbitrary

 

if you liked those LSD songs, i'd recommend the album as a whole:

 

 

: )

 

i'll try to come up with less watered-down examples of d'n'b eventually lol, but speaking of this unpredictable jungle-dream pop connection, i recall an old Kevin Shields interview in which he mentioned that he used to spend hours listening to pirate radios that would play drum n bassthroughout late 91 and 1992 and that it really influenced the loveless follow up he had in mind at the time. i guess the only traces of that are in M B V's "Nothing Is" but there are so many what ifs there!! ha... even i feel like i've heard several jungle/drum n bass songs in the late nineties without having a clue of who was behind it. i'll keep in mind the Burial interviews you mentioned as well.

 

of course, it's not surprising that Bowie saw it as the next big thing at the time as well.

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yeah! hadn't heard Szare before now but big fan of Shackleton. i think it's mark has been left on a LOT of UK dance musics and that's becoming all the more obvious recently. i was in Nottingham a few weeks back and picked up this Demdike Stare record from 2013. probably the most blatantly jungle record i've heard from recent times. i usually lump them in with the same scene as Shackleton. 

 

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i remember that Kevin Shields interview too actually. same thing he says, if i remember correctly. that, at the time, it was just from another world. 

 

gonna track down the rest of this LSD album tonight too

 

two more old favourites. always liked the songs that keep those dub root in tact. that genre was always about the drums and the bass too and fucking shit up in the studio. jungle is like speed dub or something.

 

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yeah jungle is a genre that came up in 90s UK rave scene. evolved into the better known drum & bass. separation between the two is contentious. for me, jungle just has a darker edge to it and is more experimental and wayward. drum and bass was the genre getting set in its ways a bit.

 

there's a really good and short documentary on the scene in London at the time here that revisits all the old legends:

 

 

it's basically a melting pot genre of all the dance music that was going on at the time coming together with ragga and dub and hip hop and whatever else. basically a music that reflected the multicultural communities in cities like London and Bristol and saw all styles coming together under a practice of fucking up the Amen break. despite still being underappreciated and little known globally, it's impossible to ignore as a major influence on a lot of the big players in UK electronic music.

 

Aphex Twin is the most blatant junglist to have achieved global success i think and i see him as maybe the biggest conduit for jungle's continuing influence on electronic dance music. although he obviously does something very very singular with it. his DJ sets even now heavily feature jungle tunes though.

 

 

that might not explain what it is very well. it's hard to do. it just is what it is. very hard to relate it anything.

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