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Ad Hoc

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  1. Thom has enough self-awareness to know that his electronic output is just a distraction from his day-job. Some of his fans on the other hand seem to be under the impression that he invented electronic music.
  2. On reflection, a lot of the sounds used on Amok are pretty amateurish.
  3. I don't know if at this point it might just be a better idea to wait until next year before doing another compilation. I think more than one a year might be too much a forum as inactive as this one. The last compilation didn't get that much attention in the end, so it might be better to give people some time before launching into another. I'd personally wait until early next year at least before starting another compilation thread.
  4. Yeah, I think you were just asking too much of people. Creative types want freedom and tend to switch off when presented with long lists of complicated rules and regulations, especially when knowledge of music theory is involved, which in this day and age is not something that many musicians possess to any great extent. I think a more straightforward compilation where people just submit a new song is always a better bet here.
  5. So what became of this?
  6. Ad Hoc

    Total Troll

    This album did not get enough reviews.
  7. I never said anything about your friends; it might have worked out nicely for your friends (you didn't say that they were your friends, by the way) but in general it doesn't work out all that well. You have to distinguish between specific cases and the general status quo.
  8. If you look more closely into the lives of people who claim to make a living from music without the backing of a label, you often find that they engage in a fair amount of non-musical odd jobs and temping work on the side, they keep it a secret for reasons of pride, and who can blame them. Some of them, in fact rather a lot of them nowadays, are trust fund kids as well, they don't tend to talk too loudly about that either. Generally speaking, it is borderline impossible to make a living from music off your own back nowadays, there is always more to it behind the scenes, whether it be less glamorous sources of income on the side, clandestine inheritance money or tax fiddling.
  9. That is the uncomfortable reality of the age of the web, it has resulted in major labels being the only way to make a mark. If The Smiths were starting out now, they would have to sign to a label like Parlophone to have any chance of achieving the success that they had with Rough Trade in the 1980s. It used to be touring that kept bands out of the studio, now it's the day job in Tesco or Walmart.
  10. I don't really see the point of indie labels in this day and age. The benefit of an indie label in the past was that you could get your music out there without having to sacrifice so many of your rights as an artist, the trade-off was that there wouldn't be that much money in it and your music wouldn't be very heavily promoted. The web now allows anyone to do what an indie label used to do, to get your music out there without sacrificing your rights, with all of the downsides of the web being the same as that of indie labels, lack of money and marketing. If you want people to know about your music and you want to make a decent living from it, major labels are still the way to go, you just have to be willing to let go of your artistic integrity for a few years.
  11. I am mercifully spared the burden of creativity. I do have a couple of good friends who like to fiddle with sound. They have recently been speaking of sending demos to record labels. I fear that in the 2010s, such endeavours are somewhat anachronistic and a guaranteed ticket to the town of disappointment. Should I tell them this, or am I perhaps incorrect in my assessment? Is it better to just enjoy music as a hobby in this day and age? Has anyone here ever sent demos to record labels? What happened, did you hear back from any of them? Was it worth it or did it just feel like a waste of time? And those of you who have not gone down this route, is there any particular reason why? I hope you enjoyed that assortment of question marks.
  12. I wish you the best of luck with this. Given how difficult it was for me to get people to submit anything at all, I don't envy your position here with the restrictive guidelines, but it is certainly worth giving the idea a shot, as it will encourage people to produce something new rather than submit an old song, since I doubt that anyone here has composed anything exclusively in the Locrian mode before. It will also give people an incentive to experiment with their sound a little and create something a bit different to what they are used to. My advice, given my recent experience, would be that you should perhaps not be so rigid with the dates. I have a feeling that come July you will still be waiting for most people to submit a song and so I would hold off on setting any deadlines right now and wait until you have received at least half of the compilation before deciding on a release date. I originally expected the Total Troll compilation to be finished by mid to late April, but I did not get anywhere near finished with it until well into May, and that was without any of the restrictive guidelines or a recent compilation to review. There is also a possibility that you will receive some entries that don't fit the guidlines adequately, and that will result in delays also. Perhaps if enough people struggle with Locrian mode it might be worth changing the guidelines so that people have to contribute a song in an unusual mode of their own choosing instead, any mode other than major or minor, there are lots to choose from, this could add some extra variety actually. I will attempt to contribute a song, though as a non-musician it will be difficult for me; I don't quite know where to start with Locrian mode, but I will try and get something of my own in before the 5th of July.
  13. Ad Hoc

    Total Troll

    I think that another battle of the bands is a questionable idea; music is not a competition and forcing people to choose between songs does not generate an atmosphere of musical discovery, but rather encourages tribalism. There are no two musicians on this board who sound much alike, so pairing people up would be difficult and would inevitably lead to people voting for the genre, or worse still, the person that they prefer, rather than the better song, if there even is such a thing. For instance, how could you choose between ghostofbox and mooks? How do you compare musicians as different sounding as they are? How about Magnum K.I. and ihggy-GP? Or a river in water and Lonely Loser? It would make very little sense, and it would encourage people to listen to music far too critically, rather than for enjoyment. I remember a battle of the bands about 3 years ago, and as I recall, the pairings were arbitrary, people generally claimed to be voting for genres that they were familiar with, and the eventual finalists just happened to be 2 of the most popular board members in the competition. A compilation puts everyone on an equal footing, with equal airtime, which is a much fairer way of promoting music. I will however admit that a battle of the bands can be quite fun, provided that people do not take it too seriously, which is never a guarantee with musicians. Feelings can get hurt easily, and those who lose out in the opening round can be left feeling very disheartened and perhaps find themselves questioning whether or not they should even bother with music. This is hardly something that we would want to be instigating.
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